Archive for June, 2014

Around the Airpark

Monday, June 16th, 2014

The Airpark is booming with new construction, and we are so excited to welcome new families and for our current residents to expand. We would like to welcome the Cencula’s from Ohio, who recently purchased homesite 45. We are also happy to congratulate all our residents that are currently building or adding to their dream homes:  the Lacher Family – Homesite 101, the Niles Family – homesite 9, the Vezina Family – homesite 47, the Dillman Family – homesite 3 and the Montgomery Family – homesite 7, and the Rogers Family – homesite T8. Contact Bill Armstrong to book a tour to see all that has changed! Contact Bill

Taxiway

Taxiway

Lot 47

Lot 47

 

Lot 13

Lot 13

 

Lot 9

Lot 9

 

Lot 7

Lot 7

Living in Luxury Airparks

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

3943924317_5458cf9d9a_o-copyAirparks communities are on the rise again.

Fly-in airparks began as remote small neighborhoods with grass strips, have now developed into luxury fly-in developments with first class amenities and paved runways.  Located in East Tennessee, Big South Fork Airpark has a 5,500 ft. lighted paved runway with 4 instrument approaches and an on-site maintenance facility, an equestrian center, a community center and direct access to the 125,000 acre Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area with its forests, gorges and sandstone bluffs.

Like other luxury real estate developments, airparks took a big hit during the recent real estate crisis. This decrease impacted most airparks, with some closing their doors for good. The decrease in sales was also impacted by a decline in the number of active private and recreational pilots, due to the rising price of fuel, small planes and insurance. According to WSJ.com, “In the past year, as the economy has recovered, and with an effort by pilot associations and airplane makers to revive private flying, has helped demand.“ The airparks that prevailed were all well established with underground utilities and infrastructures were able to ride out the storm. We are now seeing exceptional growth, and new interest in aviation lifestyle. Big South Fork Airpark has been fortunate and there has been a need for many development updates in the past year including: new roads and underground utilities, a 91,404 square foot taxiway expansion, a new 46,656 square-foot north side aircraft apron and new construction of private residences. 

Why live in an Airpark? From WSJ.com “Ask anyone why they live in an air park and the responses are always the same. Residents love airplanes and want to be around airports. When your plane is in your hangar, it’s easy to take it out for weekends instead of spending time driving to and from an airport. Airpark residents’ brag about short trips to beaches that would be a 10-hour drive from their homes, and nightly jaunts to restaurants hundreds of miles away. People even commute to work by planes and helicopters, taxing into their private hangars at the end of the day.” The atmosphere of an Airpark is infectious; everyone has shared interests and immediate connections.  People are not just building their dream homes, but also making life long friends.

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Source: wsj.com, “Living in Luxury Air Park”, June 5th, 2014

USA Today names Knoxville one of the best places to retire

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

Knoxville1Downtown Knoxville, Tenn. (population 182,000)

Regina Santore, Realtor at Coldwell Banker Wallace and Wallace Realtors in Knoxville, said the area is attracting retirees from all over the country, including some who’ve just read about it. Others had visited before to go to a college football game (Knoxville is home to the the University of Tennessee). But people have come from places such as New York City, Ohio and Maryland.

Lots of festivals, including the Big Ears Music Festival, which Rolling Stone magazine called the most ambitious and avant-garde festival to emerge in the last decade. Then there’s the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra, the Knoxville Opera, art galleries, food and wine and shopping.

She compares the feel of downtown Knoxville’s urban landscape to South Philadelphia. “Downtown Knoxville is actually pretty small, but it is extremely walkable,” she says. “It’s very friendly.” And there are things like an English pub and a new Scottish pub. “In the last five years it has become a very obvious destination place for casual dining,” she says.

Oh, and there’s the largest fireworks display in the Southeast on Labor Day. And easy access to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Santore says retirees are moving into condominiums in converted warehouses. Prices average $300,000 for a two-bedroom, two-bath condo.

Jane Lester, soon to be 88, and her husband, now deceased, moved to downtown Knoxville 11 years ago from Maine to be closer to her son. The big attraction now is that the downtown is so safe and she loves to walk. “One of the big attractions is I am able to walk to restaurants, and walk to library (where she volunteers) and walk to church,” she says.

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